The Root Cause of the Problems of the World: A Limited Sense of Self

Tapestry Talk

What might be the root cause of the great problems of the world: poverty, homelessness, crime, violence, war, racism, discrimination, hunger and global climate change?

I contend that it is a case of mistaken identity: a false sense of self.

We each see ourselves as separate individuals – single selves distinct from other human beings, our neighbours, nature and the world. And with this illusion, we seek first what is best for our selves.

Even in our most significant relationships, discord arises with our differing views and competing needs; love and good will can be displaced by anger and resentment.

From the vantage of our separate selves, we create the illusion of the Other.

We can judge others in an instant, emphasizing differences (gender, age, body shape, colour, ethnicity and accent) with which we categorize them into groups of others.

They are then seen as competitors, enemies or threats whom we regard with fear, anger and hatred. Often we simply ignore them and treat their unmet needs and rights with apathy.

These attitudes widen the gulf between us and ultimately contribute to the problems of the world.

How can we close this gap and create a more cohesive community?

  1. We must first recognize that every human being has a personal story but also the same fundamental needs as you. We all need food, clothing, freedom, education, safe housing, meaningful activity and a sense of belonging.

We each share the same range of emotions. We all have our dreams and goals. We have all experienced disappointment, loss and heartache. We all want to be happy.

Only by seeing beyond our personal prejudices and recognizing the three-dimensional human being behind outward appearances can we foster empathy and care.

  1. We must recognize our shared connection and interdependency. None of us can survive without others. We take for granted public education, healthcare, safe streets and neighbourhoods. These are the products of the ongoing planning and work of countless individuals working for the greater good. Consider all the people who have contributed to you having food on your table – from farms to processing plants to warehouses and to stores.
  2. We must identify our shared challenges and not blame others as the enemy or the scapegoat. The problems in our community, including homelessness, hunger, injustice and crime, can only be solved with our collective creativity and collaboration.
  3. We can then begin building and strengthening our personal and social connections. This requires the support of our institutions, including our government, but it begins with each of us.

Where is the need? Who among us feels alone and needs help? What can we do together?

What is a stranger? Someone you don’t yet know.

When you are irritated by the lineups and crowds in the shopping mall or the traffic on our roads, ask yourself “What is a crowd?” and “What is traffic?” Lots of people just like you. You are part of the crowd and traffic.

When you ask “What is the world coming to?”, ask “What is the world?” You are. We are the world.

You are not just an individual. You are an integral part of a greater whole – a partnership and a family, a network of friends and a community, a part of humanity, nature and the world.

On Thursday, December 6th, 2018, I’ll be giving a free talk at the Bonsor Recreation Centre in Burnaby from 7 to 8:30 pm. The topic: The Positive Potential of Your Relationships. I’ll discuss how healthy relationship and social connections are essential to your happiness and wellbeing; the qualities of healthy relationships; recognizing and managing challenges, and how we can foster a greater sense of belonging and connectedness in our community. It’s part of the Burnaby Division of Family Practice’s Empowering Patients health education program. To register, email Leona at lcullen@divisionsbc.caor call (604) 259-4450.

 

 

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Your Health Depends on Your Relationships

 

Burnaby WWYD 1

What determines your health and happiness?

We know that it is much more than timely access to a good healthcare system. In the 2009 report of the Senate Subcommittee on Public Health, only 25 per cent of the health of the population was attributable to the health care system, 15 per cent was due to individual biology (i.e. genetics) and 10 per cent to environmental.

The remaining 50 per cent was due to a variety of social determinants, including poverty, work conditions, housing, diet and community factors.

One of the key determinants of physical and emotional health – and therefore, happiness itself – is our sense of belonging – our connection with our community.

Among the interesting findings of the 2013 My Health My Community survey were the responses to two questions addressing social connectedness. Only 45% of residents in metropolitan Vancouver had four or more people to confide in; 6% of residents had no one. Only 56% of metropolitan Vancouver residents felt a strong sense of community belonging. Not surprisingly, recent immigrants had lower rates of community belonging.

What can we do to nurture our social connections at a personal and community level and improve both our personal health and happiness and that of everyone in our community?

On an individual level, we could make our relationships a priority. Of course, at the end of every life, it is our relationships that were primal. Yet we all tend to take our most important relationships for granted.

Without daily care and attention, we can fall into conflict, become distant and neglect our most important partners in health and wellbeing. We spend more time and attention invested in work, school, personal goals and entertainment; they can take over our daily lives, leaving little for what and who matters most.

We must prioritize time each week and every day for the people in our lives. We must nurture positive interactions to offset our human brains’ natural negativity bias.

As neuropsychologist, Rick Hanson has said, our minds are Velcro for the bad and Teflon for the good. We hear criticisms and demands from others more loudly than affection and appreciation.

Your child, friend and partner need to hear five positive comments to balance out one negative just to come out even.

We need real – not electronic – face time with one another. Our lasting happiness has nothing to do with experiencing transient pleasures and acquiring more material things. Happiness can only be enjoyed in the moments we are fully present, connected with our lives and the people that are an integral part of it.

You are not just an individual. You are part of a greater whole – a partnership and a family, a network of friends and a community, a part of humanity, nature and the world.

We can help others feel more connected in our community by getting to know our neighbours, recognizing what we have in common and offering assistance when and where it is needed.

As a community – at work or school, in our neighbourhoods, and in our church and social groups – what are we doing and what can we do to reach out and connect with others? We are all a part of a greater whole, and we each play a role in the health and wellbeing of our community.

On Thursday, December 6th, 2018, I’ll be giving a free talk at the Bonsor Recreation Centre in Burnaby from 7 to 8:30 pm. The topic: The Positive Potential of Your Relationships. I’ll discuss how healthy relationship and social connections are essential to your happiness and wellbeing; the qualities of healthy relationships; recognizing and managing challenges, and how we can foster a sense of belonging and connectedness in our community. It’s part of the Burnaby Division of Family Practice’s Empowering Patients health education program. To register, email Leona at lcullen@divisionsbc.caor call (604) 259-4450.

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Keys to a Better Hospital Stay

Illnesses and accidents are unpredictable and we can’t always predict when we may end up in a hospital. Here are some tips to prepare and how to maintain a sense of control in the mysterious world of the hospital.

PREPARING FOR YOUR HOSPITAL VISIT

  1. Always wear clean underwear but don’t count on it staying clean if you’re surprised by an accident.
  2. Don’t miss an opportunity to use a washroom.
  3. Remember to wash your hands!

 

WHAT TO PACK

Essential Medical Information

  1. Your Medical History A one-page summary should include: allergies, chronic conditions, past illnesses and surgery, and family medical history
  2. Your Medicationsdrug name, dose, directions

and reason for taking it

e.g. Brand name: Tylenol

Generic name: acetaminophen

Dose: 325 mg

Directions: one tablet twice daily

Reason: for knee pain

  1. Your Preferences: An Advance Directive is a statement of what kind of medical care you would want in the event that you are unable to make your own decisions.

What procedures do you want?

What procedures do you refuse?

Under what conditions?

Who do you choose to make decisions for you?

e.g. You may not wish to have CPR (chest compressions, assisted breathing, a tube down your throat, electric paddles on the chest) if you had an irreversible, terminal condition with no hope for a return to an acceptable quality of life (by your standards).

You may not wish to be kept alive on machines if you were in a persistent coma with no hope of recovery.

TIPS:

Always plan in advance.

Talk it over with your family and friends (to avoid difficult family conflicts).

Choose someone you trust to respect your wishes.

Inform your doctor.

Put it in writing.

For more information: google “My Voice”

http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/library/publications/year/2013/MyVoice-AdvanceCarePlanningGuide.pdf

 

Comfort Items ear plugs, music, reading, word puzzles, eye mask for sleeping, toothbrush and paste, warm socks, non-slip slippers, a sweater

 

To Keep You Oriented a calendar,a quiet inexpensive clock

 

For Communication a pad of paper, pens, your glasses, hearing aid and teeth

 

What NOT to bring expensive jewelry, watches, electronics, wallets, purses, credit cards, your nicest clothes and shoes, and other prized possessions

 

Don’t bother with perfume or cologneYour neighbours may have allergies and respiratory problems

 

3 KEYS TO A BETTER HOSPITAL STAY

  1. Stay in control (and informed)

4 Things you need to know about every test, procedure and treatment

  1. The purpose or reason
  2. Common side effects or risks
  • Serious side effects or risks
  1. Alternatives (e.g. other treatments)
  2. Know your team
  3. Ask for each person’s name and role

(e.g. nurse, respiratory technician, dietician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist)

or specialty (e.g. family physician, hospitalist, surgeon, internist)

  1. Ask who is your attending or most responsible physician
  2. Set up a channel of communication

Prepare your list of questions.

Find out when your attending doctor will visit.

Key questions: What is the plan? The working diagnosis? The schedule of tests or procedures?

The results of tests? The expected day of discharge?

 

This information could be shared on a WHITE BOARD in your room or a large pad of paper at your bedside.

 

Make sure your family doctor knows you are in hospital and that hospital reports are sent to the office He or she can provide important medical information to your hospital care team

Preparing for Your Hospital Stay https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cR0qs4lY19Q&feature=youtu.be&list=PLAWTWe0JNCdHrKBo0F03pjLdDeENFrctX

Three Keys to Improving Your Hospital Stay https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1t3qDTQ48I&index=2&list=PLAWTWe0JNCdHrKBo0F03pjLdDeENFrctX

The Lonely Patient’s Guide to Hospital Land  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uu08JBbNKe8&list=PLAWTWe0JNCdHrKBo0F03pjLdDeENFrctX&index=3

 

Dr. Davidicus Wong is a physician in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

                

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What You Should Know About Diabetes

Are you at risk?

Risk factors for diabetes:

  1. Family history of diabetes
  2. A personal history of diabetes in pregnancy, polycystic ovary syndrome or metabolic syndrome
  3. Aboriginal, Hispanic, South Asian, East Asian or African descent
  4. Overweight
  5. Sedentary
  6. High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol
  7. Over 40 years of age

If you think you might be at risk, ask your doctor or take the Canadian Diabetes Risk Questionnaire (CANRISK)

http://www.diabetes.ca/take-the-test

When to test for diabetes (CDA guidelines)

Screen every 3 years in individuals over 40 years of age or at high risk using a risk calculator (e.g. CANRISK)

How do you screen for diabetes?

  1. Hemoglobin a1cover 6.5%
  2. Fasting glucoseover 7.0 mmol/L
  3. 75 gm 2 hour glucose tolerance testwith a fasting glucose over 7.0 mmol/L or

2hr glucose over 11.1 mmol/L

Know your numbers – What everyone with diabetes needs to know about their lab tests

  1. Hemoglobin a1c:reflects your average glucose level over the past 2 to 3 months; does not require fasting; not equivalent to glucose levels in mmol/L; Goal: less than 7.0% which generally corresponds to blood sugars under 7.0 mmol/L before breakfast, lunch & dinner AND under 10.0 mmol/L 2 hours after meals.
  2. LDL cholesterol: the “bad” cholesterol correlated with plaque clogging arteries;

Goal: under 2.0 mmol/L

  1. HDL cholesterol:the “good” cholesterol; reduces plaque in arteries; raised by eating fish and exercising; Goal: over 0.9 mmol/L for men and over 1.1 mmol/L for women
  2. Total cholesterol/HDL ratio:a measure cardiovascular risk; Goal: less than 4.0 mmol/L
  3. Microalbumin:a test for small amounts of protein in the urine; associated with potential early kidney disease; Goal: ACR under 2.0
  4. Blood pressure:a separate risk factor for vascular disease; Goal: under 130/80
  5. Estimated GFR:a blood test ordered as “creatinine”; a measure of kidney function; Normal: over 60

What physical examinations are important for people with diabetes?

  1. Complete Physical Examination

At least every 2 years to detect early complications

  1. Foot Examination by a Physician

Every year to check for damage to nerve sensation or circulation

Check your own feet every day for sores, injuries or infections.

  1. Eye Examination by an Optometrist or Ophthalmologist

Every 1 to 2 years to assess the retinal blood vessels 

What and how to eat for diabetes

  1. Don’t skip breakfast or eat one big meal at night!Frequent, smaller meals keep glucose levels more even.
  2. Healthy portion sizes.

Half the plate:Vegetables

¼ plate:starches (rice, potatoes, pasta)

¼ plate:lean meat, beans and other protein sources

One portion of fruit:e.g. one apple, ½ cup of berries

Avoid sugar-containing drinks

  1. Attend to the Glycemic Index (GI) a measure of the ability of a food to raise your blood sugar. Consume foods with a low GI in preference to those with a high GI

The GLYCEMIC INDEX (GI)

Low GI Foods to choose most often:

100% stone ground whole wheat

All Bran, Bran Buds

pasta, noodles

parbroiled or converted rice

sweet potato, yam, legumes

Medium GI Foods to choose more often:

whole wheat, rye, pita bread

oatmeal

couscous, brown & basmati rice

popcorn, green pea soup

 High GI Foods to choose less often:

white bread, kaiser roll, white bagel

bran flakes, corn flakes

white rice

russet potato

pretzels, french fries

soda crackers, rice cakes

(Source: The Canadian Diabetes Association) 

For more information read Rick Gallop’s book, The GI Dietor see the Canadian Diabetes Association’s website http://www.diabetes.ca/diabetes-and-you/healthy-living-resources/diet-nutrition/the-glycemic-index

 

The importance of PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Some physical activity (such as walking or housework) after each meal will reduce after meal blood sugars

Guideline recommendation: 150 minutes of exercise/week or 30 minutes/day.

 

The Four Foundations of Self-Care

  1. What you eat(What you put into your body).
  2. What you do(physical activity and rest).
  3. How you feel(emotional wellbeing).
  4. How you connect(healthy relationships). 

Keys to Achieving Your Goals

  1. Choose wisely.A goal that matters to you.
  2. Visualize yourself having achieve your goal.Reprogram your subconscious and prime the pump for success.
  3. Break it down from supersized to manageable morsels.You’ll gain confidence with early successes.
  4. Write down the details
  5. Anticipate and prepare for roadblocks.
  6. Enlist support. Choose a coach or a teammate – your partner, friend or neighbour. Consult your family doctor.

Create the SMARTEST Goals for Yourself

Be Specific.What are you going to do? Eat more fruit and vegetables? Where and by when?

Measurable.How many fresh fruit/day? One salad every day? Two glasses of skim milk each day?

Achievable.Set realistic goals that are do-able.

Relevant.The goal has to be important to you and your health.

Time-specific.What day will you start, and when will you finish?

Evaluate.How did you do? What did you learn?

Stepping Forward. What will you do next? What will you do differently?

Together.Who will work with you next? Who will you share with?

 

Your Positive Potential

I believe that we each have a unique potential in life, and it is our duty to realize that potential and help others achieve theirs.

With knowledge, engagement and support, we can manage chronic health conditions and lives well.

Dr. Davidicus Wong is a physician in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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The Patient-Doctor Relationship: Making the Most of Every Medical Visit

Prepare for your medical visit by:

(1) making a list of your concerns,

(2) sharing it with the staff when you call for an appointment,

(3) briefly reviewing that listat the beginningof your visit with your doctor and

(4) bring a pen and paper to write down the things you wish to remember.

 

The 4 things you should know about every medication, treatment or investigation a doctor recommends:

  1. Indication (What is it for?)
  2. What are the common risks(or side effects)?
  3. What are the major risks (or side effects)?
  4. What are the alternatives?

 

The key details you need for every drug:

  1. Indication (What is it for?)
  2. Potential Interactions (with food or other drugs)
  3. Brandname& generic name
  4. Dose (e.g. mg) and frequency (e.g. twice daily)

 

5 things you should know about your Medical History:

  1. Allergies
  2. Family History
  3. Hospitalizations, Major Illnesses, Operations
  4. Chronic Medical Conditions
  5. Medications

 

KEYS TO ACHIEVING YOUR GOALS

  1. Choose wisely.Make it a goal that matters to you.
  2. Visualize yourself having achieved your goal.Use the power of attraction to reprogram your subconscious mind and prime the pump for success.
  3. Break it down.Turn that daunting supersized goal into manageable morsels. Gain confidence with early success and progressive achievement.
  4. Write down the details.

 

SMART goals are:

Specific.What are you going to do? Cycle, swim or run? Where will you do it? When will you do it?

Measurable.How many minutes? What distance? How fast?

Achievable.Realistic goals that are do-able for you.

Relevant.The goal has to be important to you and your health.

Time-specific.What day will you start the change? When will you finish?

  1. Anticipate and prepare for roadblocks.
  2. Enlist support.Consult your family doctor, choose a coach you’ll answer to, or get a friend to join you.

Dr. Davidicus Wong is a physician in Vancouver, B.C., Canada. 

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What You Should Know About Medical Ethics

Medical Ethics or Bioethics is the application of ethical principles to healthcare

Dilemmas arise when these principles conflict.

A treatment is considered appropriate if the potential benefits outweigh the potential burdens or harm.

Life support (e.g. CPR, artificial feeding and ventilation) is appropriate if it provides an acceptable quality of life (as judged from the patient’s perspective).

Why Ethics Matters

Medical ethics is the foundation of medicine and applies every time you interact with a healthcare provider.

Our tests and treatments are merely tools. Ethics guides us in their appropriate use.

The Principles of Bioethics

  1. Nonmaleficence: The first rule of medicine: “Above all else, do no harm.”
  2. Beneficence:Do good. The primary goal of medicine is to help the individual patient.
  3. Autonomy:The right of the capable individual to direct his or her own healthcare. Informed consent is an essential aspect of autonomy.
  4. Justice:Be fair. Treat like cases alike.
  5. Confidentiality:Respecting personal information

When Confidentiality Can Be Breached

Duty to Protect: When you pose a serious threat to others

Duty to Report: unsafe drivers, child protection, certain sexually transmitted infections

Court Order

Minors and others who rely on others to provide consent

What has access to your records?

  1. Your physician’s professional staff
  2. Other healthcare providers involved in your care (your hospital team, specialists to whom you are referred)
  3. 3rdparties (insurance companies, lawyers) with your written consent (or by court order)

Informed Consent requires:

  1. Sufficient information about the benefits, risks and alternatives of a test, procedure or drug before you can choose or refuse it.
  2. An individual capable of understanding the situation and the available options and able to make and communicate a decision.

 Preventive Bioethics

With proactive reflection and discussion, future ethical dilemmas may be avoided.

  1. Anticipate the future when you may be incapable of medical decision-making and suffering from serious illness.
  2. Understand the benefits and burdens of CPR, artificial feeding and artificial ventilation.
  3. Consider what gives your life meaning and what constitutes a good quality of life.
  4. Communicate your values and your wishes while you can. Ensure your family knows what you would want.

 An Advance Directive is a statement of what kind of medical care you would want in the event that you are unable to make your own decisions.

What procedures do you want?

What procedures do you refuse?

Under what conditions?

Who do you choose to make decisions for you?

e.g. You may not wish to have CPR (chest compressions, assisted breathing, a tube down your throat, electric paddles on the chest) if you had an irreversible, terminal condition with no hope for a return to an acceptable quality of life (by your standards).

You may not wish to be kept alive on machines if you were in a persistent coma with no hope of recovery.

For more information: google “My Voice”

http://www.health.gov.bc.ca/library/publications/year/2013/MyVoice-AdvanceCarePlanningGuide.pdf

Dr. Davidicus Wong is a physician in Vancouver, B.C., Canada. Please note that this article related to Western medical ethics. Healthcare providers in other countries may not follow the same principles or interpret them in the same way and laws regarding access to your medical records and who can make decisions on your behalf may vary in different countries and states.

 

 

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Emotional Wellness (Davidicus Wong)

What is Emotional Wellness?

A deep sense of meaning and purpose, an abiding sense of peace, the ability to manage the stress and transitions of life, awareness of your thoughts and feelings and the ability to manage them.

 

Why emotional health matters

  1. Emotions influence our behaviour, our relationships and our thinking.
  2. Anxiety holds us back from doing what we need to do, from moving forward, from reaching out, and from giving our best to the world.
  3. Depression is a major cause of disability and absenteeism from work or school.

Video: Why Emotional Health Matters https://stage.divisionsbc.ca/Burnaby/emotionalhealth.

 

Anxiety Disorders

When your anxiety has a significant impact on your function at work, school or home or in your social life.

  1. Generalized Anxiety:excessive worry about many things
  2. Panic Disorder:recurrent panic attacks (symptoms may include chest pain, a racing heart, sweats, shortness of breath and dizziness)
  3. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: repetitive intrusive thoughts or recurrent compulsions to perform an act (e.g. checking, handwashing, rituals)
  4. Social Anxiety: excessive anxiety in specific social situations e.g. large groups, interviews, shopping
  5. Phobias:extreme specific fears e.g. spiders, heights, flying

 

Mood Disorders

The Symptoms of Depression: fatigue, change in sleep, change in appetite, impaired concentration,  forgetfulness, thoughts of death or suicide, self-blame and guilt, feeling sad, hopelessness, lack of enjoyment or pleasure, loss of motivation.

 

Bipolar Disorder:episodes of depression and mania/hypomania (heightened mood and energy, overconfidence, decreased need for sleep, impaired judgment, decreased need for sleep, delusions of grandeur)

 

Psychotic Symptoms:impaired reality testing, delusions (fixed false beliefs), hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not real), disorganized behaviour e.g. schizophrenia

 

Video: 4 Key Emotional Health Skills https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4iPjKBOY-U&list=PLAWTWe0JNCdHMVTJSe4Jk_vhb53H2jk-b&index=1

Key Emotional Health Skills

  • A Meditative Practice to calm your mind, centre your thoughts and reflect.

Recommended Reading on Mindfulness: Joseph Goldstein, Thich Nhat-Hahn, Jon Kabat-Zinn.

 

Cognitive Therapy

  • Reflect on the thoughts that trigger your emotions. Is there another way to look at the situation?
  • Question the underlying beliefs behind unhealthy thinking.
    • Identify your cognitive distortions
    • all or nothing thinking – seeing all the bad in another person or situation; catastrophizing – imagining the worst;
    • excessive self-blame

Recommended Reading:Mind Over Mood by Padesky and Greenberger; Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman.

 

Visualizing Your Goals

  • Turn your problems into goals.
  • Instead of replaying the past or ruminating on the negative, think about what you want.
  • When you are most relaxed, visualize yourself having achieved your goal.
  • How do you feel? What do you see? What do you hear? Make it real!

 

Managing Stress

  • Burnout: when the demands of work or life exceed our ability to manage them.

 

Seizing the Locus of Control

  • Identify your sources of stress.
  • Are you reacting in proportion to the stress?
  • Recognize what you can change or control.
  • Accept what you cannot change; assume responsibility for what you can.
  • Recognize your choices.

 

The 80/20 Rule: 20% of our reaction to a situation is related to the facts; 80% arises from what we bring from our past and how we conceptualize the present.

 

The Daily Management of Stress

Be a good parent to yourself:

  1. Go out and play.Have an exercise routine.
  2. Don’t skip meals.Schedule regular healthy meals.
  3. Go to bed.Get enough sleep and take regular breaks.
  4. Go to the doctor.See your own family doctor appropriately.

Express your emotions with those close to you with a group of confidantes. Form or join a support group.

Live in accord with your values.

Attend to your relationships.

  1. Foster emotional intimacy.Agree on a habit of checking in with one another each day. How are you feeling? How was your day?
  2. Show your affection. Express your positive feelings.
  3. Schedule regular dates.Commit your time to what matters most. Don’t wait ‘til there’s time; make time!
  4. Communicate in a healthy way.Take a breath and let anger cool before you react. Acknowledge the other’s feelings and point of view. Express how you feel without blame.
  5. When things get stale, have an affair. . . with your partner.

 

Video: Keys to Managing Stress https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zoN-lIlx460&feature=youtu.be&list=PLAWTWe0JNCdHMVTJSe4Jk_vhb53H2jk-b

Where to Find Help

Canadian Mental Health Association

cmha.bc.ca

Courses, resources, cognitive therapy and support.

 

Burnaby Mental Health

fraserhealth.ca (604) 453-1900

Assessment, treatment, counselling and crisis intervention.

 

Cameray Child & Family Services

203 – 5623 Imperial Street, Burnaby (604) 436-9449 cameray.ca

Counselling for children and families.

 

AnxietyBC

anxietybc.com

Education, cognitive therapy courses.

 

 

Mood Disorders Association of BC

mdabc.net

Support groups, cognitive therapy and wellness programs.

 

SAFER  (604) 675-3985

Education, support and counselling for those who have suicidal thoughts, have attempted suicide.

Support for family members.

 

The Four Foundations of Self-Care

 

  • What you eat(what you put into your body).

 

  • What you do(physical activity and rest).

 

  • How you feel(emotional wellbeing).

 

  • How you connect(healthy relationships).

 

Please share this information with your family, friends and anyone else who may find it helpful.

Together we’ll create a healthier community and a healthier future.

Posted in Burnaby Division of Family Practice, Emotions, Empowering Healthcare, empowering patients, Happiness, Healthy Living, Positive Potential, Preventive Health, Self-care, stress management | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment