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Compassion Emotions Empathy Grace Happiness Healthy Living Love Positive Change Positive Potential Purpose

#8 I resolve

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I resolve:

  • To live life more deliberately.
  • To spend rationally but love passionately.
  • To consider everything I put into my mouth, realizing I am what I eat and my health depends on it.
  • To consider everything that comes from my mouth, recognizing my power to help or harm.
  • To drive without distraction, knowing that the lives of others depend on it.
  • To live as I wish to be remembered.
  • To treat people as if it was my last chance to show kindness and care.
  • To treat the people I love, lovingly.
  • To frame each day with thoughts of thankfulness so that I may more graciously receive the gifts of the present.
  • To see something new in the people and things I see each day.
  • To hear the music in the voices I hear this day.
  • To see the beauty in my world, in others and in myself.
  • To make a positive difference in the lives of those I can touch.
  • To act out of character.
  • To create something new each day.
  • To take one step each day towards my dreams.
  • To dream big.
  • To laugh each day – loudly, often and with others.
  • To laugh until I cry.
  • To cry as long as it makes me feel better.
  • To see myself as part of something bigger than my own self – incomplete in isolation but essential to the whole.
  • To be an agent for positive change in my school or workplace and at home.
  • To do something each day that brings happiness to someone else.
  • To do something each day that brings me happiness.

Ready to take a fresh look at life, question self-limiting beliefs and discover enduring happiness? Join me in “A Hundred Days to Happiness.” Since February 1st, I’ve been sharing insights I’ve learned from my patients, friends and family. Each day, I will post one new insight on facebook.com/davidicus.wong,

Categories
Positive Change Positive Potential Your Goals

What’s Your Resolve? How to Achieve Your Goals

Some of us don’t bother with either resolutions or goals. We go about our days and do what absolutely has to be done – sometimes at the last minute, sometimes too late – and leave the rest for later (or someone else).

Some of us set goals – like quitting smoking, joining a new exercise program or eating a healthier diet but just can’t get started. Sometimes we start off great but get sidelined by unexpected obstacles.

A few have been successful at meeting many of the goals they have set. The first two keys to their success are (1) motivation (They chose the right goals for themselves – what they cared about) and (2) planning (They achieved a number of incremental goals. You can’t get to the peak of the mountain in one giant leap. Each step will bring you closer, and each step closer increases your confidence and sense of achievement).

Next: The Keys to Success & Achieving Your Positive Potential

Categories
Positive Change Positive Potential Your Goals

Chinese New Year Resolutions: A Second Chance for Procrastinators

I think of the Chinese New Year as another crack at New Year’s resolutions for those who procrastinate. This includes all of us because after all, we all put something off. Though we’ve paid the bills, got enough insurance, fed the kids and bought the groceries, we may not have kept in touch with all of our friends, stuck to the best diet, become as fit as we can be and exhausted our bucket list. There’s always something we should or want to do but somehow never find the time.

Of course, some are better at putting things off than others. Married men tend to have longer procrastination lists. That’s not because they are any less organized or capable than anyone else. When someone else is adding extra duties to your to-do list, it’s harder to take ownership and commit to those extra tasks.

That’s not unlike the fate of many “doctors’ orders.” When we set goals that a patient doesn’t embrace, we shouldn’t expect them to achieve them. What would you do if someone who doesn’t live in your home tells you to lose a few inches, exercise more, take some new pills and give up your favourite pleasures?

Coming up: What is your resolve?

 

Categories
Happiness

A Hundred Days to Happiness: I Resolve

As a third generation Chinese-Canadian, I can’t speak Chinese and growing up, most of my knowledge of Asian culture came from the Kung Fu T.V. series. The Chinese New Year is just another reason to go out to a Chinese restaurant with family without whom I couldn’t order much more than Combo Meal B.

Yet the Chinese New Year is a second chance for us procrastinators to make resolutions to shed routines that aren’t working for us and to live our lives better or at least more deliberately.

Here for your consideration is my menu of resolutions. Check those that speak to you or be inspired to write out the change you want to make today.

I resolve:

  • To live life more deliberately.
  • To spend rationally but love passionately.
  • To consider everything I put into my mouth, realizing I am what I eat and my health depends on it.
  • To consider everything that comes from my mouth, recognizing my power to help or harm.
  • To drive without distraction, knowing that the lives of others depend on it.
  • To live as I wish to be remembered.
  • To treat people as if it was my last chance to show kindness and care.
  • To treat the people I love, lovingly.
  • To frame each day with thoughts of thankfulness so that I may more graciously receive the gifts of the present.
  • To see something new in the people and things I see each day.
  • To hear the music in the voices I hear this day.
  • To see the beauty in my world, in others and in myself.
  • To make a positive difference in the lives of those I can touch.
  • To act out of character.
  • To create something new each day.
  • To take one step each day towards my dreams.
  • To dream big.
  • To laugh each day – loudly, often and with others.
  • To laugh until I cry.
  • To cry as long as it makes me feel better.
  • To see myself as part of something bigger than my own self – incomplete in isolation but essential to the whole.
  • To be an agent for positive change in my school or workplace and at home.
  • To do something each day that brings happiness to someone else.
  • To do something each day that brings me happiness.